Trips

5 Hiking Destinations to Try in Perthshire

Source: muchbetteradventures.com
Written by Leo Klod

Lying in the heart of Scotland, Perthshire is overflowing with breathtaking natural beauty. If you’re an outdoor lover, it offers everything you could ever wish for – picturesque woodlands, rivers, moors, forests, waterfalls, and gardens. The best way to explore the area’s unspoilt nature is on a hike, so it’s not surprising to find numerous hiking trails in Perthshire. If you need ideas on where to hike, here are some hiking destinations to try in Perthshire.

1. Kenmore

Source: tourradar.com

Kenmore is a picturesque little village in Perthshire lying at the northern end of Loch Tay. It’s a fantastic place to enjoy outdoor activities, such as hiking around the loch, canoeing, sailing, water-skiing, and fishing. Kenmore is well-suited for walking, with many picturesque trails taking you to gorgeous places within the village.

Drummond Hill is a great place to enjoy scenic walks in Kenmore. The trail will take you through Tay Forest Park, a picturesque park managed by Scotland’s Forestry Commission. You can choose from a couple of walking trails starting from the village or at the Forestry Car Park, which is only a short distance from Kenmore. Drummond Hill is rich in habitat, where you’ll encounter lots of wildlife during your walk. Watch out for the stones with boar carvings in them.

The path through Black Rock is another picturesque walk to try in Kenmore, where you can enjoy panoramic views of Kenmore from Black Rock. It’s an easy walk and well signposted, requiring a gentle ascent to a hill. The paths and forest roads are well-maintained. You can walk directly towards Drummond Hill for 3 miles or enjoy a more relaxing pace of about 4.5 miles.

2. Aberfeldy

Source: outthere.travel

Aberfeldy is another pretty town in Highland Perthshire that’s a popular spot for hiking. It lies on River Tay, Scotland’s longest river and home to the Birks of Aberfeldy, which was made famous after the famous poet, Robert Burns wrote a poem about it. Follow the footpath for two miles heading to the Falls of Moness to enjoy spectacular views.

Avid hikers would come to Aberfeldy to explore “The Birks” on foot. Birk is a Scottish word for “birch,” although this is not the only birch tree you’ll encounter during your walk. You’ll find the trees crowding the riverbank along with several other species. At the start of the walk, you’ll find the statue of the poet Robert Burns. The paths are well-maintained and a perfect place to enjoy a relaxing afternoon walk.

The path to the Birks of Aberfeldy involves twists and turns, leading you high up the riverside until you reach a waterfall. You will pass through a bridge that offers an excellent vantage point of the forest. Come here in autumn when the leaves of the birch trees start to change their colours, although it’s a fantastic place to hike any time of the year.

3. Auchterarder

Source: outdooractive.com

Another lovely village in Perthshire that’s perfect for walking is Auchterarder, which lies southwest of Perth. It’s famous for its main street, the longest in Scotland, and runs for more than a mile. Enjoy a stroll on its main street, where you’ll come across boutiques, shops, teahouses, and cosy cafes. But if you want to venture outside the village, you’ll find many beautiful walks that take you to the countryside. Plus, with some of the best accommodation in the area, you can stay in the stunning Auchterarder House, a luxury manor house in Perthshire, great for unwinding after days full of adventure.

The Avenue is a low-level trail starting at the northern edge of the village, meandering between fields, and offers magnificent views of the Grampian Mountains. It links to the Auchterarder path network and takes less than an hour. The path is narrow, and you need to walk on the uneven earthen surface. You will also be walking through self-closing gates that serve as sheep enclosures. Some paths can get muddy, especially after rainfall.

Another trail called the Black Road starts in Abbey Road. It’s only 490 miles long, involving a gradual slope and passing behind the back of private gardens. The terrain is narrow and smooth, divided into three sections, including short and uneven paths.

4. Blair Atholl

Source: world-of-waterfalls.com

Blair Atholl is a picturesque village in Highland Perthshire, lying at the intersection of the Tilt and Garry rivers. It’s famous for the magnificent Blair Castle, the ancestral home of the Clan Murray, and is now one of Scotland’s most famous attractions. As you walk through the village, you’ll enjoy the gorgeous views of the river Garry flowing through Blair Atholl and into several glens.

Blair Atholl offers many fantastic opportunities to enjoy a relaxing walk, taking you to forests, rivers, and lochs, with gorgeous hills and mountains on the backdrop. Enjoy a lovely walk around Pitlochry, visit the spectacular Black Spout waterfall, and the ruined Caisteal Dubh. On this walk, you will reach the scenic viewpoint of Craigower, where you can enjoy panoramic views of the Pitlochry and even the Glencoe during clear days.

A path called “Above the Soldier’s Leap” is another great trail to try, taking you from Blair Atholl to Pitlochry, passing through lovely birch woods and into Craig Fonvuick, which has a fantastic viewpoint. The trail then leads to a scenic path along Loch Faskally.

5. Crieff

Source: murraypark.com

Crieff is a holiday resort town set amidst the stunning scenery of Perthshire. It’s a favourite destination among outdoor enthusiasts, offering many trails where avid hikers can enjoy a leisurely walk. When hiking in Crieff, you’ll come across magnificent landscape scenery and many beautiful attractions.

The Currochs Path is a circular path in Crieff, taking you to MacRosty Park and into Glenturret Distillery. It joins the trail known as the “Lovers Walk,” one of Crieff’s hidden gems. During your hike, you’ll enjoy the views of lush woodland and listen to the relaxing sounds of the river as you walk along the riverside path. It’s about five miles and should take less than 3 hours.

If you don’t mind walking a hilly path, you can tackle the “Knock Path”, which takes you to a hill about 278 metres tall and where you can enjoy breathtaking views of the Highlands. It’s a short and easy walk around the base of the hill although you may need to take a steeper walk through the lush woodlands.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Leo Klod

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